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FITNESS WITH A HEART

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JCC Operating Hours

Normal Facility Operating Hours

Sunday8:00 am - 2:00 pm

Monday5:30 am - 8:30 pm

Tuesday5:30 am - 8:30 pm

Wednesday5:30 am - 8:30 pm

Thursday5:30 am - 8:30 pm

Friday5:30 am - 6:00 pm

Saturday8:00 am - 2:00 pm

Fitness Center Hours

Sunday8:00 am - 2:00 pm

Monday5:30 am - 8:30 pm

Tuesday5:30 am - 8:30 pm

Wednesday5:30 am - 8:30 pm

Thursday5:30 am - 8:30 pm

Friday5:30 am - 4:00 pm

Saturday8:00 am - 2:00 pm

Pool Hours

Sunday8:00 am - 1:45 pm

Monday5:30 am - 12:45 pm
4:00 pm - 8:15 pm

Tuesday5:30 am - 12:45 pm
4:00 pm - 8:15 pm

Wednesday5:30 am - 12:45 pm
4:00 pm - 8:15 pm

Thursday5:30 am - 12:45 pm
4:00 pm - 8:15 pm

Friday5:30 am - 1:00 pm

Saturday8:00 am - 1:45 pm

Membership Office Hours

SundayCLOSED

Monday9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday9:00 am - 4:00 pm

SaturdayCLOSED

Holiday Hours 2022

Friday, April 15

Erev Passover

5:30 am - 1:00 pm
Saturday, April 16

Passover, D1

Closed
Sunday, April 17

Passover, D2

8:00 am - 1:00 pm
Friday, April 22

Passover, D7

5:30 am - 1:00 pm
Saturday, April 23

Passover, D8

Closed
Monday, May 30

Memorial Day

8:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday, June 5

Shavuot, D 1

8:00 am - 1:00 pm
Monday, July 4

Independence Day

8:00 am - 1:00 pm

Book Group

JCC MetroWest Book Group

Our book group is free, open to both members and non-members, and you can join and begin attending at any time! Due to the ongoing Covid pandemic, all meetings will be held on Zoom until further notice. All book discussions will begin at 12 noon and will be immediately followed by talks with the authors at 1:00 pm. Click the button below for the Book Group archives. For more information contact, Katy Strulson, 973-530-3915, [email protected].


 

Thursday, May 19
The Lost Shtetl, by Max Gross
For decades, the tiny Jewish shtetl of Kreskol existed in happy isolation, virtually untouched and unchanged. Spared by the Holocaust and the Cold War, its residents enjoyed remarkable peace. It missed out on cars, and electricity, and the internet, and indoor plumbing. But when a marriage dispute spins out of control, the whole town comes crashing into the twenty-first century. This seemingly light fable may leave you meditating on serious questions. Imaginative and philosophical, funny and sad, old and new — mazel tov, Mr. Gross. (Kirkus) Winner of the National Jewish Book Award.

Tuesday, June 21
Little Pieces of Me, by Alison Hammer
Paige Meyer gets an email from a DNA testing website announcing that her father is a man she never met. Could this be why Paige never felt like she fit in her family, and why her mother always seemed distant? And what does it mean for Paige’s memories of her father, a man she idolized and whose death she is still grieving? Back in 1975, Betsy Kaplan, Paige’s mom and a straight-laced sophomore at the University of Kansas is tired of playing it safe. A night with the golden boy on campus has unexpected consequences. Betsy is determined to bury the truth and rebuild a stable life for her unborn child, whatever the cost. Told in dual timelines, Little Pieces of Me examines identity and how the way we define ourselves changes (or not) through our life experiences.

Wednesday, July 20
Rhapsody, by Mitchell James Kaplan
Rhapsody, spanning the years 1917 to 1937, portrays the life of Kay Swift, one of Broadway’s first female composers, extracting her from the shadow of her colleague and lover, George Gershwin. Swift, married to a Jewish, philandering financier, had three beautiful daughters and an aching desire to create provoking music. An encounter with George Gershwin alters the course of her life, propelling her on an intimate odyssey from domesticity to renowned composer. Snappy dialogue and lush prose bring the Jazz Age to life as Kaplan takes readers from Harlem rent parties to the stage lights of Broadway. Many famous names play bit parts along the way, among them Langston Hughes, Duke Ellington, Dorothy Parker, and Fred and Adele Astaire.

BOOK GROUP ARCHIVES

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Read Reviews

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An Afterlife – Intense – 4-Star – “Many books have been written about the Holocaust but not that many about the survivors and their life afterward. This book follows Ruby and Ilya, first in a DP camp in Germany and then trying to make a new life for themselves as refugees in New Jersey.” -Gaye Olin